Gratitude. The most valuable gift l own

This year has without doubt been one of my most challenging, marked with incredible highs and lows and so much profound change.

The beginning of the year started with a devastating backwards step in the surgical part of mygender transition journey,causing my dysphoria to sky rocket and my mental health to plummet.

I did not expect to surface from all that until my surgical issues had been fixed but to my great surprise l met someone who was to heal me of both present and past dysphoria and catapult me forwards into a journey of exciting sexual awakening and sexual exploring.

Now, approaching the end of the year l am facing the prospect of losing my mum. Whether that’s losing her to the numerous complex medical issues the hospital just can’t manage to solve, or losing her to the emerging vascular dementia which is causing so much confusion and disorientation. Either way, my mum is rapidly disappearing.

On top if this I received a date for surgery to finally sort out the issues that began at the beginning at the year. It was such poor timing and l wasn’t sure l could manage it mentally or physically with all that’s going on with mum. However, l am glad l decided to go ahead as the surgery was apparently a very simple and successful fix.

If l was to pin down the one thing that has enabled me to get through this incredibly rocky year it would be gratitude. My ability to be grateful is the most effective tool in my mental health tool kit and l consider my ability to be grateful in any situation to be the greatest gift l own.

Gratitude is such a magical gift, akin to alchemy it can turn the most awful situation into one of hope, promise and possibility. By simply switching ones view away from what’s lacking or missing towards even the smallest thing you can find to be grateful for, you can turn sadness into joy.

Once you start noticing those small things to be grateful for, it sets off a snowball effect and before you know it sadness and difficulty is made much more bearable By the warm blanket of gratitude you find yourself enveloped by.

Gratitude is an action induced feeling, you cant sit around and wait to feel grateful you have to put the work in and actively decide you want to be grateful and look for things to be grateful for. Once you start this practice you will strengthen your gratitude muscle and find it starts to become automatic.

Don’t take my word for it, try it for yourself. Sit and write a list of ten things you are grateful for and notice how your whole sense of self shifts into feeling lighter and your face softens into a smile.

I am so grateful for the ability to practice gratitude. Such a magical gift indeed.

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Walking The UK Coastline-Challenging Anxiety One Walk At A Time

 

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My love of walking started at a very early age. As a young child, I would challenge myself to walk further and further from my house each time, revelling in the excitement of discovering new streets or play-parks and feel a huge sense of achievement on being able to then navigate my way back home.

As an adult these adventures continued, though on a much wider scale of course, I loved travelling to new parts of the UK and discovering unfamiliar places.  However, these adventures became very tainted as they were fuelled with drink and drugs and became more about running away from myself than about immersing myself in somewhere new. Eventually, my ability to travel was taken from me by a thick, dark cloud of depression and anxiety.

Since I began my road to recovery in 2010, my passion for walking and adventure has returned with a childlike innocence and excitement. Being set free from the dark prison of anxiety, I feel like I am seeing places through the eyes of my childhood self all over again, the thrill of stepping foot in an unknown town and navigating my way around, the overwhelming joy of turning a corner and having every single one of my senses come alive in response to breath-taking sights and scenery. Even more joyful is re vising the places I travelled to during my “geographical’s”, (a term we use in our recovery fellowship to describe moving to new locations to try to solve our issues rather than facing them). Being able to revisit these places with fresh eyes and a fresh mindset, reflecting on the past and how far I’ve come, is a delight in of itself. Now, walking has become a huge part of how I stay mentally well.

However, of late I have had a lot of emotional blows, meaning that my mental health has taken a bit of a downturn. More surprising and rather alarming to me, is that my anxiety has returned.  Due to this. over the last few months I have been finding it increasingly hard to motivate myself to get outside and I am constantly finding excuses to stay indoors and isolate. I need to work hard to address this now before it escalates out of control.

For this reason, I am setting myself a mission to encourage myself to get outside and to challenge the anxiety. This mission is to walk the entire coastal path of mainland UK. I am not setting a deadline for this, or a schedule, timeline or mileage goal. I am just going to walk it in sections over time until its done and document it on the way in film and in writing.

Everything I share across all my blogging and vlogging platforms, is based around the topic of recovery and self-development and this will new venture will be the same. I will walk this journey with the purpose of taking care of my mental health and to challenge the anxiety. A lot of times I will be revisiting places from the past, from times when I was very mentally unwell and when I was using drink and drugs to medicate myself.  Revisiting these places will be a valuable opportunity to reflect on the past and to use it for new growth and I will share my reflections with you when I do so.

Logistics of the walk

I am still working out how I am going to tackle the completion of this walk, other than knowing I will first start with the south west coast path and that I will be completing it’s 630 miles in sections. I like to do things in order and that part of me wants to complete the sections in the “proper” clockwise direction, starting in Minehead and finishing in Poole. The other part of me feels It would be best to start on my doorstep, completing the path in sections on either side of me. Doing it this way, it would make sense to break it into two phases, first traveling anticlockwise in sections from Dawlish to Minehead and then travelling clockwise in sections from Dawlish to Pool. Maybe I am overthinking it?! I would welcome anyone’s thoughts on this and will update about my decisions in due course.

Rules of the walk

Walking should of course be a chance to be free of rules and constrains, but for the purpose of completing this challenge I need to set out my own definitions of what completing a walk of the entire UK coastline means. I have read numerous blogs of people walking the coast and from those I have come up with the following rules for my own walk:

  1. I will walk mindfully and in tune with nature, using the opportunity for mental, emotional and spiritual growth
  2. I will walk as close to the coast as possible as long as it is safe and legal to do so, using footpaths and roads when it isn’t
  3. I will start each section I walk at the place I finished at in my previous walk
  4. I will not use public transport other than for travelling to and from my start and finish points. This means I will also walk the sections that are not so scenic or where I have to walk further away from the coast if it’s not accessible
  5. When I meet a river or estuary I won’t cheat by going around it on public transport, I will cross it using a bridge or ferry, if neither are available I will cross at the nearest and safest public crossing point
  6. I will exclude islands and peninsulas as part of the challenge but I may decide to walk them if possible